Champagne or Sparkling? Or Both?

some of the small champagne producers in the region are producing fabulous wines at at fraction of the cost. And Champagne is beautiful as a region, so obviously I will have to go back. The only question is how soon and where to visit?

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As far back as I can remember I thought champagne was wine. Sorry I thought sparkling wine was wine, but my grandma called it champagne. In fact it was Baby Duck wine and I owe champagne, wait any sparkling wine, wait any drink you put in your mouth a huge apology for thinking Baby Duck was champagne. Or a drink of any kind. Baby Duck was a big deal in the 70s, the only way I can describe it is extra sweet alcoholic 7-up (sorry 7-up). But my grandmother loved it and I learned to associate champagne with glamour, special occasions, and celebrations. So obviously I wanted in.

It wasn’t until I was 19 I got try try actual champagne. My mom had bought a bottle of Dom Periginon to celebrate a birthday I think. Though my palate was underdeveloped (quite probably from a university diet of Kokanee beer and Southern Comfort, thankfully not together, but still shudder), I loved it. Bearing no resemblance to Baby Duck this s champagne was delicious and unfortunately  for my mother, it is the only champagne she drinks.

I say that because, the world of champagne, indeed sparkling wine are vast. varied, and delicious. I was always fascinated by champagne and learned quite early on that only the Champagne region of France can produce actual champagne. Everything else is a sparkling wine, or a cava, or a cremant, or a prosecco. Well you get the idea. But I didn’t really understand the difference. So I did what anyone would do, set a serious course of study and travel to understand the difference. That is my fancy way for saying, I started drinking a lot of sparking wine. champagne

My first real foray into the sparkling wine arena came courtesy of @benton8tor’s British cousins. My first trip to the UK was in 2006 and we were meeting them at a pub. For lunch. I thought we’d be ordering a beer maybe. Upon greeting us, his cousin ordered a bottle of Tattinger Champagne.( We actually ended up finshing 2 the rest of that day is a bit of a haze) I am still unsure if I was more surprised that the pub carried champagne or that we ordered a bottle for lunch. By the way, I have definitely gotten over the surprise at ordering a bottle of wine for lunch and embraced it. Though I still haven’t embraced the breakfast beer. Teresa poured us a glass and another and another. By this time, my palate had evolved and I was in, in in. This champagne was fascinating. The bubbles were light, with a hint of toast which I later found out is quite common due to the amount of time the wine rests sur lie ( on dead yeast cells). Ok champagne, lets do this.

However my budget can’t afford non stop champagne so I had to try other sparkling wines. I stupidly thought because they weren’t champagne, they’d be inferior, they aren’t. They are just different. I have tried cremants from Limoux in Languedoc France ( the actual birthplace of sparkling wine). They are delicious, light, easy drinking with still those toasty, nutty notes. I loved cremants from both Bourgogne and Jura. In fact I love sitting on a patio in Beaune on a hot day enjoying a Bourgogne cremant. It feels both decadent and light. thumbnail_IMG_0721

The British have really embraced champagne and upon visiting London, we often book afternoon tea complete with champagne (usually Tattinger or Bollinger). Eating those delightful cakes and tea sandwiches with a glass of bubbly is heaven. Sometimes I remember to drink the tea. The Royal Hourseguards offers a fabulous champagne tea. https://www.guoman.com/en/london/the-royal-horseguards/restaurants/afternoon-tea.html That said I personally love going to the old OXO tower factory that is converted with the fabulous OXO tower restaurant and enjoying a glass of one of their many champagnes while gazing out over the Thames.  http://www.oxotower.co.uk/who/oxo-tower-restaurant-bar-brasserie/This last trip to London we  found ourselves with sometime to kill before boarding he train at St Pancras. So obviously we had to go to the Searcy Champagne bar. http://searcysstpancras.co.uk/ Right in the middle of the station, this bar offers a extensive selection of champagne is a super cool art deco environment. It make you feel special and relaxed. Just like champagne!!! It really is the drink of celebration.

At home, cavas and prosseccos are readily available and I have learned to appreciate the cavas especially. Cavas are a sparking wine from Spain and have similar charactertics to the Limoux cremants. All these cremants,  cavas and California and Canadian sparkling wines (thankfully not baby duck) are made in the traditional method or ancestral (which is different but still recognized) method., which means they are made the same way as champagne,aged sur lie though less time,  riddled, disgorged, with a cuvee ect.. but they have a different climate, soil and grapes (well sometimes).Prosecco the Italian sparkling wine is not made in the traditional method. It is a light bright, sparkling wine and very approachable. It is not my favourite. It lack the complexity and flavours of the other sparkling wine which is appealing for some. Just not me. Either way I have learned to appreciate the less expensive but delicious cousins of champagne and use them for celebrations like Canada Day,melting snow, housewarmings, birthdays, Christmas, and Tuesdays. However champagne still has my heart.

It was this love for champagne that took me to its epicentre Reims. Reims for those of us who watched Max the Mouse cartoons growing up is where Joan of Arc met Charles the Dauphin. It is also home to the Reims catherdral where every French King was crowned.http://www.cathedrale-reims.com/ It is also the capital of Champagne and famous for St Remi converting Clovis to Christianity. thumbnail_IMG_0723And it is home to some of the most famous Champagne Houses on the planet. Mumm, Pommery, Bollinger, they are all there.  https://www.champagne-bollinger.com/en/INT/ But I had my sights set on Veuve Clicquot. Famous for being led by the widow Clicquot (hence the name Veuve Clicquot) in the 1700s who came up with the idea for riddling racks that ensure we don’t actually drink the dead yeast cells, Veuve Clicquot is rumored to be among the very best. https://www.veuveclicquot.com/en-ca

And it is. The tour led by an amazing guide Sammi Jo explains the difference and the process of crafting these beautiful wines. Champagne is set on a very distinct soil of limestone and chalk with fossilized sea creatures. Champagne is very far north for a wine producing region with less sunlight than the southern regions.  This contributes to a very distinct flavour profile. As well they take their traditions very seriously from the blending of the wine, to the riddling, to the aging to the opening of the bottle. Despite what popular culture tells us don’t pop that bottle. Instead use a towel and gently twist the cork out, you sure hear a soft hiss. This preserves the integrity and bubble in the wine and quite honestly it is much much safer. Also make sure you have the right glass to drink it in. The tulip shaped is best for fully appreciating the champagne. Flute is second best. Though retro and fun, a coupe is a terrible champagne glass and does nothing for appreciating the complexities of this delightful wine. The tour at Veuve Clicquot started with an explanation of the region and the grapes they use  ( only 3  Pinot Noir, Pinot Meunier, and Chardonnay) On a 30 degree day and sweating we descended into the chalk cellar and it got cool really quickly. This is here the champagne we will later enjoy starts its life in the bottle. The cellars are fascinating but my favourite moment obviously is Sammi Jo pouring us a glass of Vintage Veuve Clicquot and it is simply the best champagne I  ever tasted. Light with floral and toast with the best bubbles, I finished my mothers as well. I am almost sure she was ok with that. Veuve Clicquot knocked it out of the park. I would recommend visiting the other houses as well. http://www.champagnepommery.com/en/marque/champagne-pommery Reims is a beautiful city that has tons to offer including said cathedral with Stained glass made by Mark Chagall. So take time to see it along with the Champagne houses. That said, some of the small champagne producers in the region are producing fabulous wines at at fraction of the cost. And Champagne is beautiful as a region, so obviously I will have to go back. The only question is how soon and where to visit?

But for now it is is the end of 2017 and start of 2018. So that means time to celebrate this first year of Vines and Voyages and welcome 2018 with a glass of Veuve  Clicquot of course. Cheers!thumbnail_IMG_0739

Rooftops, Cava, and Game of Thrones. Welcome to Seville

Seville if you go once, you be back again and again and again.

Seville, the Southern Spanish city and capital of the Andalusia region is a city unlike any other. I have to admit despite my love of travel, Spain wasn’t really high on my list. I had heard endless stories from friends who traveled to Spain in their late teens, early twenties and most stories revolved around bars, clubs and beaches. Likewise the British families we knew seemed to view Spain as a sun and resort destination. So it fell off our radar also because we were too lazy to just understand how much more and I mean much much more Spain had to offer and how diverse it really is.

So back in 2015, @benton8tor started talking about wanting to visit Spain, I started ignoring him and preparing my argument for why we should visit Rome. (back in 2014, @benon8or paid a hefty like transatlantic airfare hefty price for a parking and speeding ticket in Italy, he was pretty bitter ). However, being someone reasonable adults which include absolutely no sulking fits, we compromised and greed to do both Spain and Rome. I had read a little about Seville and Granada bu we ended up picking Seville. I thought it was because of its proximity to Sherry production, I later learned it was because of it Game of Thrones connections. and the food… oh my the food is simply delicious.

I mentioned Seville is in Andalusia in Southern Spain. This is more important than I realized, Spain s exceptionally regional. For instance, paella should come from Valencia etc.. Seville takes pride in its Moorish culture an architecture and it is truly on of the mos visually stunning cities I have ever seen. Courtyards with plants, inlaid stone and tile work, clean beautiful streets, Seville was a site to behold. From he Golden Tower to the Cathedral, to the Place de’Espagne, http://www.andalucia.org/es/turismo-cultural/visitas/sevilla/otras-visitas/plaza-de-espana-2/ Seville was a site to behold. But the Alcazar, oh my gosh. IMG_4232The Alcazar is now a museum but was a former Royal palace. It is beautiful  and beyond beautiful. The tile work and stone work is almost incomprehensible in its beauty. the gardens and water features are equally gorgeous. Full of history, you can easily spend a day there. And if you are a fan of Game of Thrones, you will definitely want to see it as many of the scenes of the Water Gardens of Dorne. Both the Alcazar and Place de’Espagne are well well worth it. http://www.alcazarsevilla.org/

 

As is the rooftop patios. Seville is literally full of them and hey afford stunning city views, usually a pool and poolside drinks. Our hotel the Fontecruz Sevilla Seises http://www.fontecruzhoteles.com/hotel-fontecruz-sevilla-seises/ had a beautiful rooftop with views of the cathedral and poolside drinks. Seville is very hot in the summer, often 40 degrees so a poolside dip can make all the difference. that and the mists they spray you with both on the patio and street level. But part of he fun of the rooftops is the drinks, Spain is famous for its reds and Sherries. Both are exceptional but its cavas on a a hot day with their crisp flavours, light bubbles and overall deliciousness really captured my heart. that said, Spain’s wines should be tasted as much as possible, far more diverse than we often see, the reds can be both light, fruit forward and full bodies, with deep flavours from several regions. The wine pairs exceptionally well with the food here but hat is a whole other post. Suffice it to say, try the gazpacho and oxtail lasagna for sure!  In fact if I would have to go back to Seville just so Ben can eat that lasagna again and hen talk about it for the next 364 days. and shop. Seville’s artisans produce beautiful tile work ,jewelry, and clothing. Seville has fabulous streets for wondering and exploring shops, spices, stopping for wine and hen continuing on your day with more exploring.

Seville is also and easy spot for day trips to the beautiful villages surrounding. Seville if you go once, you’ll be back again and again and again.