Wine Not Strasbourg?

However my real disappointment came when I finally tried the cremants from Alsace back in Canada. not because they weren’t amazing they are! they are so amazing all I could think was ” I could have been drinking these the whole time.’

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I can’t quite remember why I wanted to go to Alsace, especially Strasbourg but if I think back, it is probably because I love the French dish Choucroute garnie. IMG_6041Choucroute garnie is a regional dish from Alsace . It is made from sauerkraut, sausage and often ham hock, shoulder or even bacon. It is made with white wine (Alsatian of course) and it is all kinds of delicious. Enough of a reason to visit Strasbourg, the capital of Alsace for me.

If you visit Alsace, Strasbourg in particular, you could be forgiven for not knowing if  you are in Germany or France. Alsace through its history has been both German and French and both cultures have a historical and cultural presence in Alsace. The half timbered houses, meat and sausage heavy dishes speak to its German influences (as does the use of sauerkraut). The love of wine, baguettes and its tarte flambee/flammekueche suggest its French influence. Despite the name flammekueche is a onion tart dish with cream that reminds me more of France.

Strasbourg in Alsace is beautiful. The Petit France area in particular is full if life, good food and plenty of pottery that is beautiful and unique. (seriously bring and empty suitcase and buy lots of it!!!) the river in Strasbourg is scenic, and dotted with tons of little river boat cafes.

We didn’t eat here but it was a great spot to stop for a mid afternoon drink. Which I did of course. Strasbourg is also the host to the European Parliament . It is well worth a visit. http://www.europarl.europa.eu/portal/en

So obviously when we arrived  in Strasbourg we were on a mission. Te mission included eating as much local cuisine as possible, (check), buying as much pottery as possible (check and check) , exploring the beautiful city (check), and of course appreciating the Alsatian wine (check but really fail)

I love French wine and if you asked me, I would have told you I truly appreciated the wine from Alsace. And to be fair I did try it but as a person who doesn’t really drink white wine, I failed to understand what I was ordering and didn’t really take the time to understand and appreciate it. I quickly switched to back to reds (mostly from the Rhone) and carried on smugly thinking I had given Alsace wine a fair shot. I didn’t though.

Since then I have been taking the French Wine Scholar Course online through the Wine Scholar Guild (Yes that is an obvious humblebrag) and After studying the Alsace region. Well I knew nothing and failed to appreciate it even more! Alsace uses the German method of labeling ( that is putting the grape on the label) and use Riesling, Klevner, Pinot Gris, Pinot Noir (to make whites and roses!! and a few reds) and Gewurztraminer as the main grapes. Few of the varieties are blended and if they are they are known gentil (contains 50% of the Noble grapes)or Edlezwicker which is blended with any Alsace grapes. Knowing and understanding the grapes (especially the blends) with the soil type and vineyard (is it a grand cru?) can make for a more pleasant wine drinking experience. For instance if you like Rieslings and blends, you may want to try a gentil. also the Alsatian wine glasses are beautiful. Short clear goblets with a green stem!

However my real disappointment came when I finally tried the cremants from Alsace back in Canada. not because they weren’t amazing they are! they are so amazing all I could think was ” I could have been drinking these the whole time.’ They were smooth, easy drinking but still sparking. Perfect for the warm summer day! I encourage everyone to try them, they are incredibly enjoyable and considerably less expensive. Also if you don’t enjoy the sweetness that often accompanies a prosecco or the crispness of the cava, the cremant from Alsace is for you! That said, If you like white, Alsace has truly amazing whites, which I have also since discovered.

However to truly appreciate the Alsace wines, take a road trip on the wine route down to Colmar. I know that is my plan for my next visit to Alsace, that an an empty stomach for the amazing food and empty suitcase for the pottery!