Champagne or Sparkling? Or Both?

some of the small champagne producers in the region are producing fabulous wines at at fraction of the cost. And Champagne is beautiful as a region, so obviously I will have to go back. The only question is how soon and where to visit?

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As far back as I can remember I thought champagne was wine. Sorry I thought sparkling wine was wine, but my grandma called it champagne. In fact it was Baby Duck wine and I owe champagne, wait any sparkling wine, wait any drink you put in your mouth a huge apology for thinking Baby Duck was champagne. Or a drink of any kind. Baby Duck was a big deal in the 70s, the only way I can describe it is extra sweet alcoholic 7-up (sorry 7-up). But my grandmother loved it and I learned to associate champagne with glamour, special occasions, and celebrations. So obviously I wanted in.

It wasn’t until I was 19 I got try try actual champagne. My mom had bought a bottle of Dom Periginon to celebrate a birthday I think. Though my palate was underdeveloped (quite probably from a university diet of Kokanee beer and Southern Comfort, thankfully not together, but still shudder), I loved it. Bearing no resemblance to Baby Duck this s champagne was delicious and unfortunately  for my mother, it is the only champagne she drinks.

I say that because, the world of champagne, indeed sparkling wine are vast. varied, and delicious. I was always fascinated by champagne and learned quite early on that only the Champagne region of France can produce actual champagne. Everything else is a sparkling wine, or a cava, or a cremant, or a prosecco. Well you get the idea. But I didn’t really understand the difference. So I did what anyone would do, set a serious course of study and travel to understand the difference. That is my fancy way for saying, I started drinking a lot of sparking wine. champagne

My first real foray into the sparkling wine arena came courtesy of @benton8tor’s British cousins. My first trip to the UK was in 2006 and we were meeting them at a pub. For lunch. I thought we’d be ordering a beer maybe. Upon greeting us, his cousin ordered a bottle of Tattinger Champagne.( We actually ended up finshing 2 the rest of that day is a bit of a haze) I am still unsure if I was more surprised that the pub carried champagne or that we ordered a bottle for lunch. By the way, I have definitely gotten over the surprise at ordering a bottle of wine for lunch and embraced it. Though I still haven’t embraced the breakfast beer. Teresa poured us a glass and another and another. By this time, my palate had evolved and I was in, in in. This champagne was fascinating. The bubbles were light, with a hint of toast which I later found out is quite common due to the amount of time the wine rests sur lie ( on dead yeast cells). Ok champagne, lets do this.

However my budget can’t afford non stop champagne so I had to try other sparkling wines. I stupidly thought because they weren’t champagne, they’d be inferior, they aren’t. They are just different. I have tried cremants from Limoux in Languedoc France ( the actual birthplace of sparkling wine). They are delicious, light, easy drinking with still those toasty, nutty notes. I loved cremants from both Bourgogne and Jura. In fact I love sitting on a patio in Beaune on a hot day enjoying a Bourgogne cremant. It feels both decadent and light. thumbnail_IMG_0721

The British have really embraced champagne and upon visiting London, we often book afternoon tea complete with champagne (usually Tattinger or Bollinger). Eating those delightful cakes and tea sandwiches with a glass of bubbly is heaven. Sometimes I remember to drink the tea. The Royal Hourseguards offers a fabulous champagne tea. https://www.guoman.com/en/london/the-royal-horseguards/restaurants/afternoon-tea.html That said I personally love going to the old OXO tower factory that is converted with the fabulous OXO tower restaurant and enjoying a glass of one of their many champagnes while gazing out over the Thames.  http://www.oxotower.co.uk/who/oxo-tower-restaurant-bar-brasserie/This last trip to London we  found ourselves with sometime to kill before boarding he train at St Pancras. So obviously we had to go to the Searcy Champagne bar. http://searcysstpancras.co.uk/ Right in the middle of the station, this bar offers a extensive selection of champagne is a super cool art deco environment. It make you feel special and relaxed. Just like champagne!!! It really is the drink of celebration.

At home, cavas and prosseccos are readily available and I have learned to appreciate the cavas especially. Cavas are a sparking wine from Spain and have similar charactertics to the Limoux cremants. All these cremants,  cavas and California and Canadian sparkling wines (thankfully not baby duck) are made in the traditional method or ancestral (which is different but still recognized) method., which means they are made the same way as champagne,aged sur lie though less time,  riddled, disgorged, with a cuvee ect.. but they have a different climate, soil and grapes (well sometimes).Prosecco the Italian sparkling wine is not made in the traditional method. It is a light bright, sparkling wine and very approachable. It is not my favourite. It lack the complexity and flavours of the other sparkling wine which is appealing for some. Just not me. Either way I have learned to appreciate the less expensive but delicious cousins of champagne and use them for celebrations like Canada Day,melting snow, housewarmings, birthdays, Christmas, and Tuesdays. However champagne still has my heart.

It was this love for champagne that took me to its epicentre Reims. Reims for those of us who watched Max the Mouse cartoons growing up is where Joan of Arc met Charles the Dauphin. It is also home to the Reims catherdral where every French King was crowned.http://www.cathedrale-reims.com/ It is also the capital of Champagne and famous for St Remi converting Clovis to Christianity. thumbnail_IMG_0723And it is home to some of the most famous Champagne Houses on the planet. Mumm, Pommery, Bollinger, they are all there.  https://www.champagne-bollinger.com/en/INT/ But I had my sights set on Veuve Clicquot. Famous for being led by the widow Clicquot (hence the name Veuve Clicquot) in the 1700s who came up with the idea for riddling racks that ensure we don’t actually drink the dead yeast cells, Veuve Clicquot is rumored to be among the very best. https://www.veuveclicquot.com/en-ca

And it is. The tour led by an amazing guide Sammi Jo explains the difference and the process of crafting these beautiful wines. Champagne is set on a very distinct soil of limestone and chalk with fossilized sea creatures. Champagne is very far north for a wine producing region with less sunlight than the southern regions.  This contributes to a very distinct flavour profile. As well they take their traditions very seriously from the blending of the wine, to the riddling, to the aging to the opening of the bottle. Despite what popular culture tells us don’t pop that bottle. Instead use a towel and gently twist the cork out, you sure hear a soft hiss. This preserves the integrity and bubble in the wine and quite honestly it is much much safer. Also make sure you have the right glass to drink it in. The tulip shaped is best for fully appreciating the champagne. Flute is second best. Though retro and fun, a coupe is a terrible champagne glass and does nothing for appreciating the complexities of this delightful wine. The tour at Veuve Clicquot started with an explanation of the region and the grapes they use  ( only 3  Pinot Noir, Pinot Meunier, and Chardonnay) On a 30 degree day and sweating we descended into the chalk cellar and it got cool really quickly. This is here the champagne we will later enjoy starts its life in the bottle. The cellars are fascinating but my favourite moment obviously is Sammi Jo pouring us a glass of Vintage Veuve Clicquot and it is simply the best champagne I  ever tasted. Light with floral and toast with the best bubbles, I finished my mothers as well. I am almost sure she was ok with that. Veuve Clicquot knocked it out of the park. I would recommend visiting the other houses as well. http://www.champagnepommery.com/en/marque/champagne-pommery Reims is a beautiful city that has tons to offer including said cathedral with Stained glass made by Mark Chagall. So take time to see it along with the Champagne houses. That said, some of the small champagne producers in the region are producing fabulous wines at at fraction of the cost. And Champagne is beautiful as a region, so obviously I will have to go back. The only question is how soon and where to visit?

But for now it is is the end of 2017 and start of 2018. So that means time to celebrate this first year of Vines and Voyages and welcome 2018 with a glass of Veuve  Clicquot of course. Cheers!thumbnail_IMG_0739

In Camden Town

For those in the Real Ale Movement, the Bree Louise pub is where it is at. This pub is old school London but clean, very friendly and the food is out of this world

By now I have been to London roughly a dozen times and it never disappoints. London is full of things to do for the tourist and/or traveler, history buff, theatre buff, shopping aficionado, well you get. London is also big. It is very easy to stay in Westminster and think you’ve seen London. Mainly because you will have done so much!! Over the years I have stayed in Westminster, Bermondsey/Southwark, Kensington, tower Hamlets, and Bayswater. We have explored more. But I had never been to Camden and if I am honest had no real desire to go. I loved Westminster and its theatre scene and Southwark. I got comfortable.

This past spring, work brought me back to London so we decided to tack on a few vacation days at the end. However where I was presenting was by St Pancras Station. It wasn’t convenient to stay in Westminster so Camden it was. A couple of hours after I arrived, all I could think was why did I wait so long?IMG_0699 Camden has to be seen to be believed. At any given time of the day Camden High street ( and one you are over the bridge Chalk Farm Road is bustling. But not with the frenzied, focused energy you find in Westminster or the City. You get the feeling that people would actually stop to chat and a lot of them do. After the conference, we could really explore and we did.

For those in the Real Ale Movement, the Bree Louise pub is where it is at. This pub is old school London but clean, very friendly and the food is out of this world. @benton8tor nearly lost his mind at the beer selection which unlike other London pubs had a huge variety. Some from local brewers. Fun Fact Camden is home to local breweries, Camden Brewing. IPA, Bitters, the like. It is mainly cask ales. Side note: they also serve the best ploughmans with local cheeses.http://www.breelouise.pub/

If you are in the mood for pubs, Camden has lots to offer Some are a little rougher, (i.e. the Good Mixer, home to Amy Winehouse and Noel Gallagher) and it doesn’t accept cards but a fabulous spot for any music lover, full of history (and probably other things). It was in the Good Mixer 061, watching pool and listening to Camden’s own group Madness that we knew we were really here! http://www.thegoodmixer.com/  But the Lock Tavern was one of my favourites. It on Chalk Farm Road and Harmood. Harmood is the street where @benton8tor’s grandfather lived so it had special significance for him. It was still March and London was 21 and sunny ( I was both horrified global warming! and ecstatic sunshine!!! In March ! In London!!) so we could sit on their roof top terrace overlooking the famous Camden Market. They had a good beer selection too. http://www.lock-tavern.com/080

Camden Market, located in the old horse stables has to be seen to be believed. Not high fashion but trendy fashion forward shops alongside steam metal punk shops, shoe stores, food vendors of every persuasion, milliners, antiques, and tourist shops. A definite must do. I bought one of my favourite dresses ever in Camden street. @benton8tor bought a watch. Ben’s approaches to watches are not to tell time but rather do they look interesting or cool. So when he was looking at a rather interesting watch in a Camden store, I knew he wasn’t serious about buying it. Also it was 50 pounds. He ended up getting it for 20. 069Considering he didn’t really want it to begin with, I am not sure who won that barter. That said it is an awesome watch. https://www.camdenmarket.com/

Though Camden was fascinating, it was new to me and new can be overwhelming. So when we met Ben’s cousins for dinner, I was relieved it was in Westminster. Alighting at the Leicester Square tube station, I took a deep breath, touristy, busy and full of energy I felt like I was home. I knew where I was going, where to find my favourite shops, pubs ect.. I relaxed. And dinner was a Joe Allens famous for its position in the theatre district and a good place to watch for celebrities. The food is good and wine list even better.  http://www.joeallen.co.uk/

But back to Camden we went. We had little time left and new we couldn’t possibly do everything we wanted to. Gin tasting, a visit to the breweries, that would have to wait until next time. However we managed to squeeze in dinner at Chutneys a very delicious vegetation Indian restaurant. And my piece resistance, snack and champers at Searcy’s champagne bar in St Pancras station. Searcy’s manages to mix a 1930s art deco vibe with very modern decor, right in the middle of a train station. Literally right beside a train. We had some lovely champagne and we said our farewells to Camden. http://searcys.co.uk/

We were in Camden 1 week after the Westminster Bridge terror attacks. Since then, England has suffered 2 more horrifying attacks. But the British culture of resilience and support is stronger. If you are thinking about visiting England, don’t be deterred. You would be far more disappointed not to go and despite media reports, there is a far greater chance you will be completely safe and have the time of your life.